Is Vietnamese New Year the same as Chinese New Year?

Vietnam culture: Is Vietnamese New Year the same as Chinese New Year?

Today, I will answer 2 most important questions: What are the similarities and differences between Vietnamese New Year, aka Tet and Chinese New Year? And Do Vietnamese people get offended when Tet is being called Chinese New Year.

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43 Responses to "Is Vietnamese New Year the same as Chinese New Year?"

  1. We can understand lunar new year in east Asia. Chinese also just call it lunar new year in China. Chinese new year is more oftenly called when Chinese go overseas, because westerner don't understand lunar calendar, they just understand new year on Jan 1st or Christmas. Chinese new year is better understanding for them when Chinese talk about our new year with westerners.

    Reply
  2. 🥟 饺子 and noodles 面条 are more for the Northern Chinese while 🐟 (鱼) signifies the family having surplus year after year (年年有余).

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  3. pretty stupid in my opinion. rabbit becomes cat?? you don't just change it to whatever you want. what's next? how about change dragon to donkey??

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  4. Eating dumplings in lunar new year is a tradition of northern Chinese only. There is no such tradition in this South such as Hong Kong, Macau or Guangdong

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  5. We don't like Chinese due to them always invading Vietnam even now, so don't relate us to Chinese.

    We may have some Chinese mix blood, but we are Vietnamese now and not Chinese! No relation to China!

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  6. Technically Japan does celebrate the Lunar New Year they just changed the date(perhaps that means they dont??? But thats how it was explained to me they do its just changed)

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  7. Đọc lại lịch sử đi. Bánh chưng bánh dày có lịch sử 4k năm, tức là trước 1k năm đã có, vậy bảo ai ảnh hưởng ai.

    Reply
  8. Em mới biết đêan kênh của chị. Chị nói hay ghê á. Chị có thể chia sẻ về cách chị học tiếng anh được không ạ. Em cảm ơn chị

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  9. Thank you for this video! I am Viet and I get annoyed hearing people call it the Chinese new year. I do call it the Chinese new year when I talk with my Chinese friends but I prefer lunar new year since that doesn't exclude people.

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  10. If someone treats you bad and you continue to get involved with them you seriously need help because of low self esteem which mostly VN peoples are. Western countries advanced because they are standing up against bullying.

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  11. It is not ignorant at all to call it Chinese new year. The fact that this new year is celebrated in other part of the world doesn't make it wrong to be called Chinese new year. Lunar new year, on the other hand, is a wrong name although I dont particularly mind about it

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  12. I mean reading back in history of Vietnam – which I had to (I am not much of a history guy, but we did it in a university class while I was in Saigon), It isn't VN news year at all, during the changes after/post war the holiday itself was reset and renamed by new staged leaders.

    The idea that the streets of Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh look like China town on TET is kind of a give away, also the traditions of what is done is the same as China as well as the processes.

    its not a bad thing at all, in America we have holidays none American we adapted too, but ideally to say TET is a VNese holiday is a bit in accurate with no local proof to even consider it.

    All jokes aside Saigon is one of my favourite places to be during TET, its so peaceful and its one of the best time to hit markets in Go Vap for killer deals on cloths and other hardware things 🙂

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  13. Dont call "Chinese New Year", "Vietnamese New Year" or whatever "Country New Year" just call it lunar new year, and everyone will be happy.

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  14. bánh chưng và bánh dày làm gạo là văn hóa lúa nước, há cảo và mì làm từ bột mì là văn hóa của người hán ở phương bắc có khí hậu lạnh, đã đồng hóa các dân tộc ở nam sông Dương tử trong nhiều nghìn năm

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  15. Lunar New Year is like Happy New Year on January 1st of each new calendar year. It’s just a public holiday with no significant cultural attachments.
    Every nationality is proud of its cultural identity. Chinese New Year festival goes on for 15 days with different cultural practices each day.
    Vietnamese Tet goes on for 3 days. During this period, Vietnamese proudly practice their inherited cultures, different to the Chinese practices.
    Korean Sollal, has their own cultural practices. In many ways different to the Chinese or Vietnamese.
    To respect each other’s cultural practices and identity is the greatest honour.
    Not to lump everybody under one umbrella.

    Incidentally, Muslims, Hindus, Jews, Buddhists, etc. also have their New Year based on Lunar Calendar cycles.They will be most offended if we simply call their’s Lunar New Year.

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  16. Different part of China has different tradition and food. Those food introduced as CNY food could be from the north. Southern Chinese has different food for the occasion like "nian gao" (new year cake), "jiandui" (sesame balls) or "tangyuan" dessert.

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  17. They're the same thing that happen in two different countries. It is like Christmas in the US vs Christmas in Canada. Most people don't get offended, but some might do.

    Reply

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