10 VIETNAMESE TABLE MANNERS AND TRADITIONS (VIETNAMESE DINING ETIQUETTE) | WHAT THE PHO

Vietnam culture: 10 VIETNAMESE TABLE MANNERS AND TRADITIONS (VIETNAMESE DINING ETIQUETTE) | WHAT THE PHO

If you are invited to a Vietnamese family for dinner, these are the 10 table manners and traditions for you to impress the host. If you want to learn more about Vietnamese dining etiquette, Vietnamese culture and food. Don’t forget to subscribe to my channel.
Editor: Văn Tiến Dũng

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49 Responses to "10 VIETNAMESE TABLE MANNERS AND TRADITIONS (VIETNAMESE DINING ETIQUETTE) | WHAT THE PHO"

  1. Hello Van. I think that the countries in these South East Asia may the same traditional and cultural such as the older came first and respect them. Thank you for this video 🙂

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  2. For the inviting part, you have to start with the oldest people down to the youngest (this refers to the adults, not the young ones), at least this is what my parent make me do. Ever time we have a feast, my parent would make a kid (mostly me as I’m the oldest) to walk from one room to another just to invite them to eat, only for them to sometime not wanting to eat.

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  3. Hi Van Vu…, Excellent video and very informative, and I ( learned a lot ) about Vietnamese table manners, traditions, and culture and a word or two… Thank you for sharing the video and excellent information on Vietnamese table manners, customs, and culture, too… Bright, intelligent, and attractive… Mike in Montana P.S.: I miss Vetnam… 🙂

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  4. When I was a kid, I used to invite anyone older than me before eating (sometimes 2x people). Now we have an extended family (4x), I use the short version haha.

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  5. Thank you for this video! I grew up half-Vietnamese in the states and growing up, my dad would continuously add bits of more food to my bowl or plate during meals. Back then it annoyed me because I'd be so full and so closed to finishing my meal and he'd plop another piece of meat or vegetables for me to finish (It was our culture to finish everything on our plates). He passed away 6 years ago and part of my healing process has been learning how to cook the foods we grew up with and learning more about Vietnamese culture as I want to visit one day. Like how you mentioned, he rarely ever said I love you. From your video, I just found out that him adding food was a sign of affection in more ways than I had ever realized as a kid. I'm currently crying my eyes out lol

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  6. I have a question. I look according to people 15 years younger than my chronological age. How would it work if I am around a bunch of Gen Z's but I am the oldest one? Do I just say "Well, I'm 40 so EXCUSE me," before sitting or….?

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  7. The religion in Vietnam is mainly Chinese-style religious worship, it is originated from the Qing Dynasty's occupation of Vietnam and most of them are of Chinese origin.

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  8. I just came across your channel. Thank you so much for this fun and informative learning! I have one question: If a guest is, for example, a strict vegetarian, or has some religious or health (e.g. food allergy) reason not to eat certain types of foods that may be served by the host, would it be rude to mention this before the dinner? Or is the guest expected to eat everything that is served?

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  9. I'm sorry madame but I don't go along with stupid superstitions and certainly will NOT get germs/possible viruses from a communal bowl!!! I can be respectful to older people and or my guests as I'd always be. Guess I won't be going to a Asia house meal. I'll just eat the good food on my own.

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  10. Surprising that Vietnamese don’t use both sides of the chopsticks. where I am from we use the opposite of the chopsticks (from the side we feed ourselves) to pick up food from common serving dish.

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  11. A little trick: If you are full, keep your bowl full, and the host will not refill it. Also helps to eat more slowly. Unless of course you want more food.

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  12. Thank you Van Vu for your Vietnamology channel. Although Vietnamese people are very understanding of foreigners, showing an understanding of their customs and traditions is a sign of respect and fosters greater friendship.

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  13. Hi Van , I always enjoy your informative Videos and give a big likes in this Video you mentioned Go the the Bathroom before eating ??? I am little confused .

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  14. Great video. How about a video on the etiquette of Vietnamese massage shops. What to look out for and the long history of massage services in the country.

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